Any smart fisherman out there knows how important it is to keep a boat safety kit handy whenever out on the water. Even those who own small power boats need to incorporate this kit. Here at CraigCat, we want to ensure you know exactly what needs to be included in the safety kit. We are here for you, Orlando.

 

Better Safe than Sorry

No matter how long you are going to be out on the water, a safety kit is still essential. You can be out on the water for just an hour, or even out there the entirety of the day, regardless a safety kit is equally essential. You can be out on the water for just a minute, yet there is still the same risk. You are still facing the same obstacles and situations. This is why it is important to invest in an emergency boat kit.

 

Only second to this main priority, your boat needs the appropriate equipment to legally pass inspections both on a federal level and by the United States Coast Guard, if you are on open seas. While some items are required to obtain permits and lower insurance costs, other items are must-haves for every boater on board, including furry passengers.

 

How To Create A Boat Safety Kit

Based on what you use your small power boats to determine precisely what needs to be included in your kit. While they include generally the same items, some additional items may be thrown in while you are boating and what activities you will be engaged in.

 

Here is out boating list for boating at sea:

  • Distress flags
    • Every boater should have the universal S.O.S. flag.

 

  • Reflective tape
    • Use 3M Coast Guard Flexible Prismatic Reflective Tape (USCGFP) to mark equipment you may need to make visible on board. Comes in several colors and widths.

 

  • Buoys
    • Your basic buoy style will suffice as a water mark.

 

  • Bailer kit
    • It’s important to have a boat bilge pump, or at the very least, a basic bailer kit with a few handy items included.

 

  • Hull plugs
    • Purchase a universal, one-size-fits-all hull plug like this one.

 

  • Desalinator
    • A saltwater desalinator will be necessary if you become stranded and need fresh water. If you’re not boating in salt water, then you can opt for a regular outdoor water filter.

 

  • You will also need a watertight and floating container to store everything.
    • First-aid kit
      • Seasickness tablets
        • There are plenty of techniques for avoiding seasickness, but when eating ginger candies or staring at the horizon fails, you’ll want to have antiemetics like Bonine or Dramamine on hand. Check out this CruiseCritic article to determine which tablet is right for you.
      • Jellyfish sting relief ointments
        • Never urinate on a jellyfish sting. It can make it worse. Peeing on jellyfish stings is an old wives’ tale and can trigger a nematocyst’s barbs to release poison and accentuate the pain. True ointments range from straight vinegar to sting ointments like this one.
      • Rehydration Salts
        • The World Health Organization does suggest a homemade formula (½ tsp salt + 6 tsp sugar + 1 qt clean water), but for the sake of convenience, stock Pedialyte packets.

 

Contact Us

When it comes to the essential items that must be in your boat safety kit, we have the information that you are looking for. At CraigCat, our inventory is sure to have something that will spark your interest. We have the most exceptional selection in Orlando. Call or visit us today and also take a look at our small power boats!

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